Rubens’ love of women. Goya’s sense of the macabre. But without Rubens’ sense of hedonistic joy, or Goya’s taste for satire. mix in that uniquely American love of pulp-y trash.
Frazetta. Need I say more? For the conclusion of my first week I thought I’d put up something special–& this cover is one of my absolute faves. Working on these covers you learn some things about the techniques & approaches of the masters that you don’t get simply by looking. For instance,  while sketching out this scenario, I definitely picked up the vibe that Frazetta was making this one up as he went along; very little –if any–preliminary drawing.  The Iron bar tracery on the gates is irregular–way too irregular for just a ruin. & The architecture in general is pretty vague. But the big clue is that, well–the Werewolf… in his attempt to conquer the Count–is sitting on Dracula. Who arranges a fight scene like that? Somebody who can make it all up directly from their imagination, that’s who. It’s not likely you’d hire models to hold this pose for any length of time!
Of course, prismacolor markers aren’t oil paint, and so I had to make some alterations to Frazetta’s color. I was quite happy to do so-what artist in their right mind wants to be compared with the maestro?